Lee and Opal Sexton live in the mountains of Eastern Kentucky, farming the land where Lee was raised. Lee is a retired coal miner and a revered banjo legend, a living link to the deep past of American music. Though now well into his eighties and hampered by age, Lee continues to perform and teach his distinctive banjo style to a new generation eager to preserve a vanishing cultural tradition.

Linefork offers an immersive view of Lee and Opal’s daily rituals and inherent resilience while documenting the raw yet delicate music of a singular musician, linked to the past yet immediately present.

This slow, meditative film presents us with such transcendent, time-stopping moments in the sludgy flow of everyday events: moments of musical transport, moments of marital love. Those little daily miracles are the film’s true subject, and they’re worth waiting for. Lee and Opal Sexton hardly seem to notice them—who does while they’re happening?—but they come at us with the force of revelation.
— From "Life Stand Still Here" by David Gates, author of Jernigan and A Hand Reached Down to Guide Me